The future of film

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I don’t know what the future of 35mm film is, but it seems uncertain at best. Kodak and Fuji have stopped making many emulsions, and most of the developing machines have disappeared from corner drug stores never to be replaced. This makes it more difficult, and expensive, for those who may want to try it out, or pick it back up again. Thankfully we have folks like Japan Camera Hunter, Camera Film Photo and FILM Ferrania (just to name a few) working at keeping the film scene alive.

As much as I enjoy digital, there is truly nothing like film. The limited number of frames, the waiting to develop or process the film, the joy of looking at your slides through a projector or on a light table, just can’t be duplicated by the digital experience. There is certainly room for both, and I sure hope film is still around when my daughters grow up.

Velvia 50 project: Backyard Sunsets

The new baby, work and life in general has kept me busy. Too busy to post more here, unfortunately. Hopefully today will make up for it. I started a project a few months ago and now it is complete and ready to share!

Not a 365 project, more like a 36 project; 36 frames of Velvia 50 to be precise. Living on a lake has the benefit of viewing beautiful sunsets over the water, so I figured since I’m homebound these days that I would load up a roll of Velvia 50 in my Leica M6, slap on the Voigtlander 21mm f4 and take a photo when one of these sunsets took place. They scanned a little darker than I would have liked, but the point is made. Enjoy!

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Leica M6 Velvia 50

Not her too…..

Not her too..

Poor Beezle. After years of having his picture taken by me, he thought that having kids would take the spotlight off of him. Now that Emily is old enough to start following in her daddy’s footsteps he has started anew! No rest for the weary…

Catching lizards

Catching lizards

So my niece and daughter wanted to catch a few critters while we were visiting Gainesville. Started with small bugs and butterflies, then worked our way up to lizards. Soon Emily realized that the net wasn’t very good for the brown anoles, so she decided to wear it. Who’s catching who?

Shot with the venerable Contax T2 on Kodak Ektar 100. Go film!

One of the rarest and most endangered plants in Florida..

Deltoid spurge

Viola!

What, were you expecting some grandiose beauty found hanging in an ancient cypress tree, only accessible by wading through the Everglades for three days? Sorry, the deltoid spurge (Chamaesyce deltoidea) has no such story.

The deltoid spurge is only found in the endemic Pine Rockland habitat (which happens to be my personal favorite) found in southern Miami-Dade county. With its habitat reduced by over 98%, there aren’t many places for this diminutive plant to go. Small? Yeah you can say that. The leaves are not too much bigger than the size of a pinhead and unless you know where to look, it is easily stepped right over. What amazes me about this and the other rare plant species found in this area is the fact that most of the plants grow on rock with no soil and little nutrients. This makes for small but incredibly beautiful plants.

When working in these areas I have to keep my eyes peeled, looking at the same spots again and again until these rare, and endangered plants make their presence known. But, their discovery is always an amazing experience since they may not be here when next I come.

PS – One of these days I will get around to showing all of you a real beauty from the Pine Rockland, the Polygala smallii.